This is a blog dedicated to a love of film, and occasionally television. There will be posts of film stills, film news, and movie reviews. I take requests!

24th January 2013

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Mama: A Strange and Fantastic FilmJessica Chastain (Zero Dark Thirty) gives a compelling performance that is a caliber above many, many horror film actresses.  Her nuanced character is believable and one you can root for.  I was originally expecting her to be the only redeeming quality of the film, but I found myself enraptured by the film for a majority of it.  Mama, directed by Andres Muschietti in his first feature length, is wonderful and tense at it’s best.  The film adds layers of magic between the ghost, Mama, and the children.  Their interactions carry levels of intensity and wonder that capture my attention every time.  The child actors were also surprisingly good, something I’ll attribute to the directors ability with his cast.  They were genuinely creepy without playing up the stereotypical “scary demon child”.  The entire film avoided many of the horror film cliches that usually plague the rest of the genre.  My only major problem with the film comes at the the very end, it left me thinking, “Well, now what?”  Which I guess is an appropriate ending for something as strange and bizarre as this film was. At the front of Mama is the question, “What does it take to be a mother?” Do you have to be the biological parent? Is it something that someone can just stumble upon and be ready for? What the film ultimately says about that is that it takes everything to be a mother.  It requires an ultimate self-sacrifice, but in return it also creates an obsessive tie between mother and child that can be harder to overcome.  Ultimately, the film leaves us with the question, “Is it worth the cost?”Highlights
Strong cast performances from everyone
Tense scenes that cause terror and wonder at the same time
Strong sense of visual style
Lowlights

WTF ending
Some loose ends are left untied
Small section of film could have been entirely cut
7.5/10

Mama: A Strange and Fantastic Film

Jessica Chastain (Zero Dark Thirty) gives a compelling performance that is a caliber above many, many horror film actresses.  Her nuanced character is believable and one you can root for.  I was originally expecting her to be the only redeeming quality of the film, but I found myself enraptured by the film for a majority of it.  Mama, directed by Andres Muschietti in his first feature length, is wonderful and tense at it’s best.  The film adds layers of magic between the ghost, Mama, and the children.  Their interactions carry levels of intensity and wonder that capture my attention every time.  The child actors were also surprisingly good, something I’ll attribute to the directors ability with his cast.  They were genuinely creepy without playing up the stereotypical “scary demon child”.  The entire film avoided many of the horror film cliches that usually plague the rest of the genre.  My only major problem with the film comes at the the very end, it left me thinking, “Well, now what?”  Which I guess is an appropriate ending for something as strange and bizarre as this film was. 

At the front of Mama is the question, “What does it take to be a mother?” Do you have to be the biological parent? Is it something that someone can just stumble upon and be ready for? What the film ultimately says about that is that it takes everything to be a mother.  It requires an ultimate self-sacrifice, but in return it also creates an obsessive tie between mother and child that can be harder to overcome.  Ultimately, the film leaves us with the question, “Is it worth the cost?”

Highlights

  • Strong cast performances from everyone
  • Tense scenes that cause terror and wonder at the same time
  • Strong sense of visual style
Lowlights
  • WTF ending
  • Some loose ends are left untied
  • Small section of film could have been entirely cut
7.5/10

Tagged: MamaJessica ChastainGuillermo del Toro

21st January 2013

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Amour:  A Powerful and Compelling Tour-De-ForceEmmanuelle Riva gave, what I consider to be, the best performance by any actress this year.  Every scene she is in feels real.  It feels as if I am really watching her slowly collapse in on herself as her body slowly decays.  Her powerful performance, along with her co-star Jean-Louis Trintignant, take a slow paced film about an elderly couple and bring it to award worthy heights.  This is not to say that their performances are the only things that are so great about it.  Michael Haneke resourcefully extends the scenes to slow paced crawl forcing the viewer to sit in on this couple’s lives.  Each lunch, dinner, reading session, every moment that they spend together feels as if the viewer is in the room with them as well.  This has a terrible effectiveness that ultimately devastates as the film goes on.  At the end of the film we are left with a meditation on what it means to love and be loved, and how awful, and powerful, that can truly be. Highlights
Strong compelling performances
Everything feels exactly how it should
Bring some tissues
9.4/10

Amour:  A Powerful and Compelling Tour-De-Force

Emmanuelle Riva gave, what I consider to be, the best performance by any actress this year.  Every scene she is in feels real.  It feels as if I am really watching her slowly collapse in on herself as her body slowly decays.  Her powerful performance, along with her co-star Jean-Louis Trintignant, take a slow paced film about an elderly couple and bring it to award worthy heights.  This is not to say that their performances are the only things that are so great about it.  Michael Haneke resourcefully extends the scenes to slow paced crawl forcing the viewer to sit in on this couple’s lives.  Each lunch, dinner, reading session, every moment that they spend together feels as if the viewer is in the room with them as well.  This has a terrible effectiveness that ultimately devastates as the film goes on.  At the end of the film we are left with a meditation on what it means to love and be loved, and how awful, and powerful, that can truly be. 

Highlights

  • Strong compelling performances
  • Everything feels exactly how it should
  • Bring some tissues
9.4/10

Tagged: AmourEmmanuelle RivaMichael Haneke

18th January 2013

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Les Miserables: An Uncompromising, but Ineffective Musical Drama During an extreme close-up of Anne Hathaway’s face I realized that this might be the most emotionally heart wrenching performance of the film. Ultimately, it did end up being that, but what it also did was destroy the rest of the film. Les Miserables suffered from failing to bring any real drama to the screen. Moments that should have been harrowing and sad were made oddly funny due to strange choices made by the actors and director. This was one of many defects found in Les Miserables. The constant extreme close-ups during songs only work some of the time, specifically during “I Dreamed a Dream”. Many times the close-ups are unnecessary and take away from the film. It is surprising to see so many close-ups when the sets were so wonderfully done. It definitely takes away from the ability to appreciate the sets. The strange choices should be acknowledged and admired for being so strongly followed, but at the same time admonished for their inability to bring about a strong drama when the story itself is strong. 
Highlights 
Anne Hathaway 
Gorgeous sets
Lowlights 
Extreme close-ups 
Odd choices by actors / director 
The actors aren’t the best singers 
7.0/10

Les Miserables: An Uncompromising, but Ineffective Musical Drama During an extreme close-up of Anne Hathaway’s face I realized that this might be the most emotionally heart wrenching performance of the film. Ultimately, it did end up being that, but what it also did was destroy the rest of the film. Les Miserables suffered from failing to bring any real drama to the screen. Moments that should have been harrowing and sad were made oddly funny due to strange choices made by the actors and director. This was one of many defects found in Les Miserables. The constant extreme close-ups during songs only work some of the time, specifically during “I Dreamed a Dream”. Many times the close-ups are unnecessary and take away from the film. It is surprising to see so many close-ups when the sets were so wonderfully done. It definitely takes away from the ability to appreciate the sets. The strange choices should be acknowledged and admired for being so strongly followed, but at the same time admonished for their inability to bring about a strong drama when the story itself is strong. 

Highlights

  • Anne Hathaway 
  • Gorgeous sets

Lowlights

  • Extreme close-ups 
  • Odd choices by actors / director 
  • The actors aren’t the best singers 

7.0/10

Tagged: Les MiserablesAnne HathawayTom Hooper

10th January 2013

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Remember that time when Christopher Nolan is going to make the next Sci-Fi masterpiece? →

Tagged: Christopher NolanInterstellar

9th January 2013

Post

70mm Film Festival at Music Box Theatre!

Just bought a festival pass so I can see some of my favorite films of all time in glorious 70mm film print in a theater! I’m so excited! There’s going to be a quite a few films I haven’t seen too!

  • Vertigo
  • 2001:  A Space Odyssey
  • Playtime
  • Lifeforce
  • Chitty Chitty Bang Bang
  • Lord Jim
  • The Master
  • Hamlet
  • West Side Story

It’s going to be so awesome. 

Tagged: Music Box TheatreFilm

6th January 2013

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Zero Dark Thirty:  An Astounding International Manhunt Slow Burn

I imagine that this film, in less capable hands, would not be nearly as good as the one I have seen today.  Zero Dark Thirty is unlike many contemporary “war” films, even Bigelow’s previous Best Picture winner The Hurt Locker.  It’s a slow burn, it builds anticipation and tension throughout it’s two and a half hour run time to the point of a fever pitch that when (spoilers, as if you didn’t know how this was going to play out) the choppers land around “The Third Floor Guy’s” compound I was on the edge of my seat.  
Maya (played brilliantly by Jessica Chastain) is the heart of this film.  As we follow her relentless manhunt we see a woman determined, someone who will not stop until she gets what she wants.  Chastain’s performance is reserved to the point where it is almost impossible to tell what Maya is exactly feeling during scene’s and it’s wonderful.  In the moments that are heated her performance is fiery.  What is so beautiful about her reserved performance comes at the end.  After all is said and done, and she has gotten what she wanted.  Is she relieved? Is she happy? Does she wish that it wasn’t over at all? I know that when the film ended I wish it hadn’t. But when it’s over. It’s over.  
9.4/10
Highlights
Jessica Chastain’s brilliant performance
Strong performances from the entire cast
Beautiful cinematography
Amazing use of tension building
I’m calling it now. This film will win Best Picture.  

Zero Dark Thirty:  An Astounding International Manhunt Slow Burn

I imagine that this film, in less capable hands, would not be nearly as good as the one I have seen today.  Zero Dark Thirty is unlike many contemporary “war” films, even Bigelow’s previous Best Picture winner The Hurt Locker.  It’s a slow burn, it builds anticipation and tension throughout it’s two and a half hour run time to the point of a fever pitch that when (spoilers, as if you didn’t know how this was going to play out) the choppers land around “The Third Floor Guy’s” compound I was on the edge of my seat.  

Maya (played brilliantly by Jessica Chastain) is the heart of this film.  As we follow her relentless manhunt we see a woman determined, someone who will not stop until she gets what she wants.  Chastain’s performance is reserved to the point where it is almost impossible to tell what Maya is exactly feeling during scene’s and it’s wonderful.  In the moments that are heated her performance is fiery.  What is so beautiful about her reserved performance comes at the end.  After all is said and done, and she has gotten what she wanted.  Is she relieved? Is she happy? Does she wish that it wasn’t over at all? I know that when the film ended I wish it hadn’t. But when it’s over. It’s over.  

9.4/10

Highlights

  • Jessica Chastain’s brilliant performance
  • Strong performances from the entire cast
  • Beautiful cinematography
  • Amazing use of tension building
  • I’m calling it now. This film will win Best Picture.  

Tagged: Zero Dark ThirtyJessica ChastainKathryn Bigelow

31st December 2012

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franksfilmboner’s Top 10 films of 2012

There’s just been far too many good films this year.  Here’s my list of what I considered my favorite films of 2012.  There are I haven’t seen, nor will I before the end of the year so this is pretty conclusive.  Let me know if you disagree / agree and what your lists are!

10.  Prometheus 

9.  Argo

8.  The Hobbit

7.  Django Unchained

6.  Skyfall

5.  Beasts of the Southern Wild

4.  Cloud Atlas

3.  The Master

2.  The Dark Knight Rises

1.  Silver Linings Playbook

Tagged: Films2012Silver Linings PlaybookTDKRThe MasterCloud Atlasbeasts of the southern wildSkyfallDjango UnchainedThe hobbitArgoprometheus

27th December 2012

Video reblogged from Noomi Rapace appreciation blog with 27 notes

noomirapace:

Dead Man Down Pre-Release Trailer

sooooooooooooo cool

27th December 2012

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Uncanny X-Force #16

Uncanny X-Force #16

Tagged: DeadpoolUncanny X-ForceRick Remender

26th December 2012

Photo reblogged from My life, as a Ging with 588,664 notes

100andsome:

With all of the words we say we’ve stopped using some particularly wonderful ones

100andsome:

With all of the words we say we’ve stopped using some particularly wonderful ones

Source: 100andsome